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Now I understand the Nobel prize

15/10/2009

sorenson2.jpg

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Machiavelli was right

1/12/2008

It is almost 10:30 pm and one can still see a little bit of light in the sky. I suddenly thought about the news.

I stopped watching news in 2004. I am preparing breakfast and getting ready to go to work at 7 am. The six pm news are too violent to watch them with children around. The 10.30 pm news are too late to make any sense of them. Newspapers are such a waste of fiber, ailment and what can one find in them that is not available in internet?§

Thus, symptoms my main source of regular news is The Economist, life which adds a nice weekly regularity to my view of the world. It also gives a step back from the urge to keep up to date with frantic change. I need to explain; I do not have my own subscription to the magazine, but one of my colleagues does. My rank is third in pecking order, so I am usually one week behind of the current issue. In addition, the preparation cycle for the magazine—writers submit the articles, say, a week in advance—makes for a more meditative approach to news. There is less of sound bite and some elements (at least) of analysis.

Despite of all the time using the web (wasting time since ‘94) and some rusty technical ability to put things together, I cannot cope with the CNN approach to news. I am writing about the split-screen, multilayered approach with text flashing at different levels, because there are too many things happening simultaneously… This, it is the end of the world, so we have to squeeze all the news in the next two minutes. Please, one thing at the time, with more than one sentence, compare/contrast, give examples, What is the opposing view? I know, it sounds Luddite, but I am not against technology, but for using technology to enrich understanding. Slogans are almost opposite to understanding, and that is what the scrolling pieces of text are: slogans.

I now remembered radio. I also stopped listening to radio. I used to follow Radio National in Australia. Well, not all the time, but when driving my Ford Cortina 1972. Then I changed cars and I stopped, not sure why. I liked AM radio, but when moving to NZ I could not find a decent radio program. I am sure if I look around I could find one, but I do not have the motivation. Maybe another day.

That leaves The Economist, supplemented with some web searches if I find something interesting. There has never been so much data available before in the history of humanity. We have never had before the current speed to propagate data. So, How come that we understand so little? Maybe we become so excited about learning new things, that we never want to spend the not-so-exciting time required to deepen our knowledge and understanding. It is harder, it takes longer, but it is richer. I am trying to go for richer.

I wrote the text above with a few interruptions. It is now 11:15 pm. Time to rest, meditate and forget the news.

It must be remembered that there is nothing more difficult to plan, viagra
more doubtful of success, dosage
nor more dangerous to manage, than the creation of a new system. For the initiator has the enmity of all who would profit by the preservation of the old institutions and merely lukewarm defenders in those who would gain by the new ones.—Niccolò Machiavelli, The Prince, Chapter 6.

E debbasi considerare, come non è cosa più difficile a trattare, né più dubia a riuscire, né più pericolosa a maneggiare, che farsi capo ad introdurre nuovi ordini; perché lo introduttore ha per nimici tutti quelli che degli ordini vecchi fanno bene, e ha tepidi defensori tutti quelli che delli ordini nuovi farebbono bene.—Niccolò Machiavelli, Il Principe, Capitolo VI.

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I want to know what you think

29/05/2008

I do not have a dog — I prefer cats, check by the way — but I understand that pet owners like to buy gifts for their animals. But what happens when your dog has everything? Well, no rx you just buy a ‘Pet Thing’.

When you need a product name

‘Pet thing’, as seen in one of those two-dollar shops.
We may differences of opinion, discount
philosophy, surgery
strategy and beliefs. I want to know those differences and discuss them on the open.

When we silence our differences we go back to a past that I am not proud of.

Press conference (that was not shown on TV) discussing the case of documentarist Elena Varela, who filmed a documentary on the conflict between forest companies and mapuches in Chile.

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Where do I fit in Waitangi day?

7/02/2008

Yesterday was Waitangi day, glands New Zealand’s national day. It commemorates the treaty that ‘created modern New Zealand’. Where do I fit in this day as a non-Maori, hospital non-European person? Considering the demographic shifts, it is hard for me to see a bicultural commemoration is embracing a more modern multicultural country. So, where is the day for celebrating ‘modern-modern New Zealand’?

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Who is Going to Stop Me

27/05/2007

Some times I have the temptation of using an external locus of control: ‘it was not my fault that x happened, seek it depended on someone else’. Ultimately, endocrinologist most of the time we are responsible for what happens (or that we let happen) to us, here and this is one of the reasons why I really dislike to see people suing McDonald’s because ‘it made them fat’ or similar I-am-not-responsible-for-myself type of frivolous legal actions.

One of my favourite quotes is used by Ayn Rand in the first few pages of The Fountainhead:

The question isn’t who is going to let me; it’s who is going to stop me — Ayn Rand.

I read this book a couple of years ago, when I really enjoyed the ideas, despited of the stilted characters and dialogues. Anyway, we can always challenge ourselves — and the world during this process — if we act upon our believes and values. Or, using Rand’s words, ‘Every man builds his world in his own image. He has the power to choose, but no power to escape the necessity of choice’. Human beings always face this choice: What is the best use of the present time? Our answers determine our success and failure in every endeavour.

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I remember when I was 20

28/03/2006

I found some old CDs, patient
including one by Schwenke & Nilo, disorder
which includes a live performance of ‘Recuerdo cuando yo tenía 20 años’ (I remember when I was 20 years old), written by Nelson Schwenke. Schwenke & Nilo was (is?) a duo from Valdivia, a city in Southern Chile where I used to live between 1993 and early 1996.

The song reflects a lot of my experiences when I was twenty, although I was actually eleven at the time the song refers to. I have hyperlinked some of the references that may not be clear for a casual reader.

I still love some of S&N songs, although I disagree with much of their politics. Anyway, they surely are consistent with their beliefs.

Recuerdo cuando yo tenía veinte años
mi pelo flotando, mi paso corriendo
saltando los charcos de calle Picarte
mi padre dormía con un ojo abierto
con el toque de queda, el alma en alerta
y yo maldiciendo milicos de mierda
con el corazon camuflado de sombras, de sombras

Recuerdo el olor de la chicha ‘e manzana
sentirse feliz por estar en la Teja
fundando ciudades, construyendo puentes
el vicerrector nos tenía prohibido
cantarle a la gente era muy subversivo
lo mejor sería agachar la cabeza
unirse al rebaño y no hacer poesía

Recuerdo en la tele Martín dale duro
jugate el pellejo como un pelo duro
recuerdo los hornos de cal de Lonquén
el gobierno escribe: así vamos bien
…mañana mejor

Recuerdo las buenas cervezas del Paula
donde Jorge Millas fumaba el futuro
lo bueno de aquello era estar convencidos
que todo lo que uno hiciera al momento
sería la llave y la puerta del tiempo
la lluvia era siempre un buen argumento
pa’ hacer navegado y bajar al invierno
al infierno…

Recuerdo a González rayando murales
y a toda la DINA escarbando mi casa
mientras yo a escondidas hacia el amor
riéndonos juntos de todo el horror
…todo el error

If you do not understand the lyrics leave it like that; please do not destroy them using any automated translator.

The CD also contained a beautiful version of Luchín, an old Victor Jara song. I think that child poverty affects me more now than ever before because Orlando is so close. And yes, I still think that capitalism is the solution.

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Free market and democracy

8/11/2005

This post is about people “saving time” doing the wrong things. The whole ‘life hacks’ area has become much more visible since the presentation by Danny O’Brien on 11 February 2004, visit this
who presented results of interviews with highly productive hackers (notes of the presentation taken by Cory Doctorow). There was a second presentation (notes by Cory again). This has spawned a number of sites treating more or less seriously; for example, Sildenafil
43 folders and Life Hacker.

Originally, the idea was very simple. These ‘high achievers’ all use mainly one application (and one file to keep EVERYTHING). This can be a combination of text file + editor, a private blog or wiki, etc. There are a few scripts using data from that file (if text) or RSS feed (if blog or wiki) to keep things synchronised. Now, how come that this concept has been expanded to cover such a diverse array of approaches?

First, different things work for different people—fair enough. However, the main problem seems to be that people have been developing all sorts of hacks for the wrong reasons. An example of the first approach is the Hipster PDA. Why bother with big electronic files if there is a simpler, low-tech approach (more about this later). Another example would be this article on dealing with email overload. The second approach, however, implies just a simple waste of time. Some examples:

  • Why do you need to worry about how to organise thousands of RSS feeds? That is clearly too much information, unless your job description is ‘to summarise thousands of feeds per day’.
  • The last few weeks there have been plenty of people worried about watching too much TV, so there are ‘life hacks’ to reduce time seating watching TV, movies, Tivo, etc. Just turn off the bloody box! Easy. There are some people clearly using too much disposable income for getting more ways to be distracted.
  • And anything iPod (in its many incarnations) related.

Let’s go back to simple and important problems and drop the fluff. Talking about fluff, I put in that category most online approaches to keep your life sane (e.g., Backpack). They imply constant connection to internet, which at least for now it is not possible, unless you are a completely urban-being with your rear permanently glued to a chair in front of a computer.

After a false start, health system
I am again putting some of my bookmarks in del.icio.us. I will probably add the tags (newish term for old-fashion keywords) to blog posts too.

Playing with cream

Paul Ford’s comments on Amish computing certainly hit a soft spot on me. I do miss Wordperfect 5.1! It was back to simpler times when using computers was certainly much more productive for me. Multitasking is a nice feature to have when strictly necessary, for sale but not all the time.

Next year I need to spend a fair amount of time writing lectures and I am certainly tempted to ‘going back to basics’. Most of the text that I need to prepare is not highly complex, generic
so I am thinking of writing at least the first drafts in text files with a simple markup. The most humanly readable markup is probably Markdown. Once the text is in Markdown it can be easily converted into html (e.g. using the Markdown dingus, and adding the ‘html’ and ‘body’ tags to get a complete page) and from there to other formats like LaTeX or MSWord. If I decide to go for a longer document probably LaTeX would be the way to go.

I have been playing with Cream, the VIM mode for dumb users like me (another distraction). I hope to slowly learn a few tricks at a time to become a more proficient VIM user, but that is not a real priority. It is a really nice editor mode!

I installed the vim-latex suite, which seems to add pretty good latex support to VIM/Cream, but it seems to override some of the Cream configurations (e.g., F9 is not code folfing/unfolding anymore). It seems to be a matter of getting used to that though. Anyway, I will not need it for the first version of the documents.

Making more changes to Tim’s site

We have had a few problems to have the PDF file of Tim’s book indexed by search engines. My theory is that engines aren’t very happy with Textpattern’s internal links (of type http://mysite.com/file_downloads/2) for a PDF file. Today we changed it to something more explicit like http://mysite.com/bookfiles/file.pdf. Actually, the story was not as simple as that. When first trying to use the new code we ran into a ‘missing page’ problem, which I traced back to a problem with the .htaccess file. I dropped a <IfModule mod_rewrite.c> condition from the file, leaving it like below and it just works.


RewriteEngine On
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} -f [OR]
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} -d
RewriteRule ^(.+) - [PT,L]
RewriteRule ^(.*) index.php

A few years ago I obtained my Australian citizenship and simultaneously—at least in theory—I lost my Chilean one. Last September the Chilean congress approved law No 20050 (PDF version in Spanish) reforming 54 aspects of the constitution including:

  • Recovery of citizenship and accepting the principle of ‘ius sanguinis’ (acquisition of citizenship through descent—textually, bronchitis
    by right of blood). This would give my son access to Chilean citizenship.
  • Elimination of designated (non-elected) and lifetime senators.
  • Reduction of the presidential period from six to four years.
  • The president can now remove commanders in chief of the military and security forces, approved
    without requiring the consent of any external authorities.
  • The National Security Council (Consejo de Seguridad Nacional) has its role greatly reduced, Myocarditis
    minimising its interference in public affairs.

Finally, after fifteen years of recovering democracy (year and a half after a famous plebiscite), there are substantial changes to the political system eliminating several of the vestiges (but not all) of a dictatorial system.

I got you! This post is not about the end of forestry activity in Tasmania, viagra 60mg
but about the end of the Forestry in Tasmania web pages. After two years compiling materials and hand formatting HTML I have decided to stop updating the sub domain. The fact that I am leaving Tasmania at the end of the year—so I will not have time to keep up to date with what is going on—is just the straw that broke… you know.

I still need to decide what to do with the site; either I will leave it unchanged for posterity’s sake or pull the plug and delete the whole thing. Over these last two years I have received a fair amount of abuse and a few examples of praise for keeping the site and trying to present a ‘fair view’ of environmental discussion in Tasmania. However, ailment whatever tries to pass as debate is so low quality that it is easy to get disheartened with what one reads in the media.

Will I start a ‘forestry in New Zealand’ page? I doubt it; my role will be completely different and forestry activity over there is much less contentious. I rather spend some time learning Maori—I am quite keen about this—and practicing the haka with Orlando.

This post started as a question to myself: Why did it take me so long to start caring about economics? Only last year, resuscitator
at age 37, sales I felt the urge to start reading about economics and its relationship with society. Before that, anaemia
I used to have this primordial (to use H.P. Lovecraft’s language) reaction towards economics, particularly its free market variants.

I think that one of the major ‘whack on the head’ moments was realising that claiming an admirable objective is completely different from achieving it. That, in addition to the realisation that many good intentioned policies actually achieved opposite effects was enough to decide start reading about economics and ‘classical liberal’ approaches. The last part of my excuse is that I was first exposed to free market principles under Augusto Pinochet’s dictatorship.

I still believe that imposing economic change without political freedom is wrong, and costed me years of rejecting open economies. The problem is this: an unelected government (a dictatorship to be honest) pushes for economic reform. Because I disagree in principle with a dictatorship and the lack of freedom, I will tend to oppose most policies, even reasonable ones. At some point this includes supporting the opposite of economic freedom, well, sort of. Chile represents a funny free market, an economic system that for many years lacked transparency.

An interesting feature of this dicothomy between ‘market freedom’ and ‘political freedom’ is the attitude towards democracy in Latin America. The Economist published the results of The Latinobarómetro poll, and even in countries like Chile—that has had major economic growth—around 50% of people are still ‘not very satisfied’ or ‘not at all satisfied’ with the way democracy works (see Figure 3 in the linked document). So, why are people still struggling to come to terms with a freer system? I would venture that there are at least two important reasons:

  • The extreme level of inequality1 still present in society. By the way, I do not believe that one of the reasons for this is the presence of a capitalist system but that the system is not truly capitalist2 yet. The major issues would be: the existence of a small number of people restricting a proper access to a market economy for the rest of the population, and lack of property rights, with a substantial proportion of transactions in an informal economy3; namely Hernando de Soto’s dead capital argument.
  • The feeling that there is a ‘restricted version’ of democracy, where there are still groups of people (e.g., higher ranks of the military, very rich people) who are beyond the reach of the legal system. That is, a feeling of lack of justice and unfairness, which I think is being corrected, albeit very slowly.

Is a future of free market and democracy possible for developing countries? I believe so, particularly if we are talking about ‘real capitalism’, with more responsible politicians and business people, as well as a preoccupation for the unintended consequences of electoral promises. May be there are too many ‘ifs’ in the previous sentence, but the experience of countries like Venezuela4—devastated by demagogy and government/business inbreeding—may be a good reminder for personal and social responsibility.

Footnotes

1 I do not think that the mere existence of inequality is in itself an issue (I do not mind about the existence of multimillionaires). The problem is when there is still a large proportion of people that has little hope for the future, as is still the case in many Latin American countries.

2 This is well put by Johan Norberg in his In defence of global capitalism book. By capitalism he means (PDF 112KB):

…the liberal market economy, with its free competition based on the right of using one’s property, the freedom to negotiate, to conclude agreements and to start up business activities. What I am defending, then, is individual liberty in the economy. Capitalists are dangerous when, instead of capitalist ownership, they join forces with the government. If the state is a dictatorship the enterprises can actually be a party to human rights violations, as for example in the case of a number of western oil companies in African states. By the same token, capitalists frequenting the corridors of political power in search of benefits and privileges are not capitalists either. On the contrary, they are a threat to the free market and as such must be criticised and counteracted. It often happens that businessmen want to play politics and politicians want to play at being businessmen. This is not a market economy, it is a mixed economy in which entrepreneurs and politicians have confused their roles. Free capitalism exists when politicians pursue liberal policies and entrepreneurs do business.

3 This problem is also linked to environmental degradation.

4 I am not ‘just picking’ on Venezuela. I lived five years in the country and have very good memories of its people and landscape.

P.S. 2005-11-10: Johan Norberg emailed me saying that ‘I’m sure I would also have shared your attitude had I experienced that’.

Filed in economics, politics 1 Comment

Getting back citizenship

1/11/2005

This post is about people “saving time” doing the wrong things. The whole ‘life hacks’ area has become much more visible since the presentation by Danny O’Brien on 11 February 2004, visit this
who presented results of interviews with highly productive hackers (notes of the presentation taken by Cory Doctorow). There was a second presentation (notes by Cory again). This has spawned a number of sites treating more or less seriously; for example, Sildenafil
43 folders and Life Hacker.

Originally, the idea was very simple. These ‘high achievers’ all use mainly one application (and one file to keep EVERYTHING). This can be a combination of text file + editor, a private blog or wiki, etc. There are a few scripts using data from that file (if text) or RSS feed (if blog or wiki) to keep things synchronised. Now, how come that this concept has been expanded to cover such a diverse array of approaches?

First, different things work for different people—fair enough. However, the main problem seems to be that people have been developing all sorts of hacks for the wrong reasons. An example of the first approach is the Hipster PDA. Why bother with big electronic files if there is a simpler, low-tech approach (more about this later). Another example would be this article on dealing with email overload. The second approach, however, implies just a simple waste of time. Some examples:

  • Why do you need to worry about how to organise thousands of RSS feeds? That is clearly too much information, unless your job description is ‘to summarise thousands of feeds per day’.
  • The last few weeks there have been plenty of people worried about watching too much TV, so there are ‘life hacks’ to reduce time seating watching TV, movies, Tivo, etc. Just turn off the bloody box! Easy. There are some people clearly using too much disposable income for getting more ways to be distracted.
  • And anything iPod (in its many incarnations) related.

Let’s go back to simple and important problems and drop the fluff. Talking about fluff, I put in that category most online approaches to keep your life sane (e.g., Backpack). They imply constant connection to internet, which at least for now it is not possible, unless you are a completely urban-being with your rear permanently glued to a chair in front of a computer.

After a false start, health system
I am again putting some of my bookmarks in del.icio.us. I will probably add the tags (newish term for old-fashion keywords) to blog posts too.

Playing with cream

Paul Ford’s comments on Amish computing certainly hit a soft spot on me. I do miss Wordperfect 5.1! It was back to simpler times when using computers was certainly much more productive for me. Multitasking is a nice feature to have when strictly necessary, for sale but not all the time.

Next year I need to spend a fair amount of time writing lectures and I am certainly tempted to ‘going back to basics’. Most of the text that I need to prepare is not highly complex, generic
so I am thinking of writing at least the first drafts in text files with a simple markup. The most humanly readable markup is probably Markdown. Once the text is in Markdown it can be easily converted into html (e.g. using the Markdown dingus, and adding the ‘html’ and ‘body’ tags to get a complete page) and from there to other formats like LaTeX or MSWord. If I decide to go for a longer document probably LaTeX would be the way to go.

I have been playing with Cream, the VIM mode for dumb users like me (another distraction). I hope to slowly learn a few tricks at a time to become a more proficient VIM user, but that is not a real priority. It is a really nice editor mode!

I installed the vim-latex suite, which seems to add pretty good latex support to VIM/Cream, but it seems to override some of the Cream configurations (e.g., F9 is not code folfing/unfolding anymore). It seems to be a matter of getting used to that though. Anyway, I will not need it for the first version of the documents.

Making more changes to Tim’s site

We have had a few problems to have the PDF file of Tim’s book indexed by search engines. My theory is that engines aren’t very happy with Textpattern’s internal links (of type http://mysite.com/file_downloads/2) for a PDF file. Today we changed it to something more explicit like http://mysite.com/bookfiles/file.pdf. Actually, the story was not as simple as that. When first trying to use the new code we ran into a ‘missing page’ problem, which I traced back to a problem with the .htaccess file. I dropped a <IfModule mod_rewrite.c> condition from the file, leaving it like below and it just works.


RewriteEngine On
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} -f [OR]
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} -d
RewriteRule ^(.+) - [PT,L]
RewriteRule ^(.*) index.php

A few years ago I obtained my Australian citizenship and simultaneously—at least in theory—I lost my Chilean one. Last September the Chilean congress approved law No 20050 (PDF version in Spanish) reforming 54 aspects of the constitution including:

  • Recovery of citizenship and accepting the principle of ‘ius sanguinis’ (acquisition of citizenship through descent—textually, bronchitis
    by right of blood). This would give my son access to Chilean citizenship.
  • Elimination of designated (non-elected) and lifetime senators.
  • Reduction of the presidential period from six to four years.
  • The president can now remove commanders in chief of the military and security forces, approved
    without requiring the consent of any external authorities.
  • The National Security Council (Consejo de Seguridad Nacional) has its role greatly reduced, Myocarditis
    minimising its interference in public affairs.

Finally, after fifteen years of recovering democracy (year and a half after a famous plebiscite), there are substantial changes to the political system eliminating several of the vestiges (but not all) of a dictatorial system.

Filed in miscellanea, politics No Comments

Pen, tablet, heaven and hell are all in thee

5/10/2005

Another bombing, troche another massacre. More killing and maiming innocent people in the name of religion, politics, big ideas or small ones.

Flashback: twelve years of Catholic school listening about good and evil, some times as abstract concepts, some times personified in strange caricatures. Then in 1982 I came across The Rubaiyat, by Omar Khayyam and read:

Pen, tablet, heaven and hell I looked to see
Above the skies, from all eternity;
At last the master sage instructed me,
‘Pen, tablet, heaven and hell are all in thee’.

There are a few bad people amongst us, walking with hell inside them. As John Quiggin pointed out, this is a time for solidarity with Indonesian people.

Filed in language, politics, quotes No Comments

Weasel words and elections

21/09/2005

I finally decided to upgrade my old trusty Koss UR-20 el cheapo headphones for something a bit more expensive—although still ultra cheap for audiophile standards: Sennheiser PX 100. They seem to be one of the best cheap headsets and they are very comfortable. I will throw away the Sony earbuds and use my Yepp with the Sennheiser.

Almost simultaneously I bought a couple of nice CD in ‘Music without frontiers’, order which is my favourite music shop in Hobart. I was looking for another Piazzolla CD but this time live. Stephan did not have any live concerts—I think I will have to order The Laussane concert, although see this page for corrections on the names of tracks—but he had The rough dancer and the cyclical night -Tango apasionado. This album is good, but not of the same stature as Tango Zero or La Camorra. If you like Jorge Luis Borges’s writings, as I do, you may be interested in this Borgessian connection with Piazzolla.

Cover of Nois 4’s Gente

The other CD I bought was Nóis 4’s Gente (the BBC has a review and Daniella Thompson has another one). This recording is a nice exploration of Brasilian music including classics and new songs by Nóis 4. My favourite track is still ‘Influência do Jackson’, although this is the type of album that grows in me with each time that I listen to it, so I expect that the ‘favourite track title’ will keep changing hands.

When reading the newspaper and driving around this little island, thumb one comes across many times with ‘best practice’ (mostly in the news) and ‘Save X’ or ‘No to Y’ (mostly in bumber stickers). They come often enough to become worn down clichés.

Best practice does not necessarily mean ‘good practice’. As an example, noun
until not long ago corporal punishment was considered best practice from a pedagogical point of view. Now it is neither considered best nor good, but an abhorrent practice. When used in environmental discussion, best practice is a catch all phrase (normally used by government) that really means we think it is good, it is done in other places and nobody has complained too much about it.

Have you ever wondered how come that there are so many things that need to be ‘saved’? Saved from what or from who? No is a very interesting word, because it means opposition and negation and it does not propose anything. If I say NO to something it seems that I do not need to be pro anything. I have met quite a few people in the environmental discussion in Tasmania that oppose forestry activity not necessarily because of the environmental effects—which are much more marked in agriculture, for example—but because is conducted by big corporations (as oppossed to many farmers). When asked ‘How would you provide all the goods and services without corporations?’ they produce very weak responses, because they have not thought the issue through, because they are against X rather than pro Y.

And going back to past elections and weasels

I have to acknowledge that I voted for Mark Latham in the 2004 federal election. In spite of Latham’s lack of coherence and a pathetic forest policy, I could not bring myself to stomach the Liberals’ policies towards refugees. As it should be clear to the reader by now, Labor and Latham had their bottoms kicked.

Back to almost the present, last week the ABC broadcasted Andrew Denton’s ‘Enough Rope’ program, after a short lived legal battle with News Limited. In the interview Latham showed to be a real psycho: he was accusing almost everybody else of acting like, mmh, Mark Latham. As Matthew 7:3 said ‘Why do you look at the speck of sawdust in your brother’s eye and pay no attention to the plank in your own eye?’ or—if you are a King James person—‘And why beholdest thou the mote that is in thy brother’s eye, but considerest not the beam that is in thine own eye?’ or—to add a Spanish touch—‘viendo la paja en el ojo ajeno pero no la viga en el propio’.

He showed complete disregard for his party colleagues, particularly Kim Beazley, the current leader of the opposition. What I find disturbing is not that he despises politicians (don’t we all do?) but that knowing the status of the party, the moral quality of his colleagues and the lack of conviction in their policies he still decided to present himself as potential prime minister material supported by that kind of people. Note to self: do not ever forget the level of stupidity reigning in the Labor party.

Filed in language, politics No Comments